Evidence-based Practices Library for Professional Development

The IEP Goal Bank for Students with Autism

How It Works

Check Out Sample IEP Goals from Digitability’s IEP Goal Bank for Special Education Students

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One Program Supporting a Variety of Transition Needs

Digitability helps educators address multiple IEP & Transition Goals for students with autism and other special education needs.

Check out Digitability’s FREE Sample IEP Goal Bank resource below for example IEP Transition Goals for communication, social, academic, self-advocacy, self-regulation skills and more!

Digitability’s Transition Curriculum is Streamlined To Make IEP Progress Monitoring Easier for Teachers

Progress Monitoring tools are available online with the click of a button, as well as off-line, based on teacher preference. All assessment tools align to the differentiated lesson plans, saving teachers planning time.

Each of your students is unique and will therefore have a wide-range of needs. Digitability Work Simulations introduce students to a variety of employment pathways. Employment experiences are differentiated to meet the individual IEP Goals.

Every Student In Your Class Gets Work Experience With Digitability’s Work Simulations

While digital literacy serves as the foundation for our comprehensive program, Digitability uses technology as a hook to develop social and communication skills, which are often a barrier to employment. Functional skills like financial literacy help students learn about spending and saving. And, of course, Digitability develops employment skills by introducing real-world employment projects that we call Digitability Work Simulations. 

Work Simulations begin by choosing a project. For example, the class may start a coffee business, learn how to market youtube videos, perform data entry, and more.

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After choosing their work simulation project, students are then hired for jobs and begin practicing workplace behavior, managing their tasks, using tech skills for independence, self-advocating, self-regulating and more.

Digitability Work Simulations include the Digitability Social Economy. In the Digitability Social Economy, students earn virtual Digitability dollars when they exhibit behaviors that will make them successful in the workplace and increase their independence. Using those dollars earned, Digitability teaches students the fundamentals of budgeting concepts, such as earning, spending, and saving.

Administrators and Program Directors can learn more about the Digitability program by requesting a free demo of the technology on this form.

Download My Free IEP Goal Bank Examples Product Packet How It Works Video Library

Digital Literacy & Safety (700+)

  • Appropriate Sharing Behavior
  • Communicating Online
  • Applied Tech Skills
  • Advanced Tech Skills

Social and Emotional (300+)

  • Self-Regulation
  • Workplace Communication/Applied Tech Skills
  • Self-Advocacy
  • Flexible Thinking
  • Time-on-Task Attendance

Workplace Connections (600+)

  • Problem Solving
  • Resume & Online Profile
  • Interviewing Skills
  • Digital Portfolio
  • Real-World Employment Projects

Functional Academics (100+)

  • Financial Literacy
  • Reading, Writing, Math
  • Interviewing Skills
  • Executive Functions

Free Demo for Administrators

Improve transition outcomes for all students with Digitability.


Check Out Digitability’s Sample IEP Goals from Our IEP Goal Bank developed for Special Education Students.

Circle Logo No White Square (1)

One Program for a Wide Range of Transition Needs 

Digitability helps educators address multiple IEP & Transition Goals for students with autism and other special education needs.

Check out Digitability’s FREE Sample IEP Goals Bank resource below for example IEP Transition Goals for communication, social, academic, self-advocacy, self-regulation skills and more!

Digitability’s Transition Curriculum is Streamlined To Make IEP Progress Monitoring Easier for Teachers

Progress Monitoring tools are available online (with a click of a button!), as well as off-line, based on teacher preference. All assessment tools align to the differentiated lesson plans, saving teachers planning time.

Each of your students is unique and will therefore have a wide-range of needs. Digitability Work Simulations introduce students to a variety of employment pathways. Employment experiences are differentiated to meet the individual IEP Goals.

Every Student In Your Class Gets Work Experience With Digitability’s Work Simulations

While digital literacy serves as the foundation, Digitability uses technology as a hook to develop social and communication skills, which are often a barrier to employment. Functional skills like financial literacy help students learn about spending and saving. And, of course, Digitability develops employment skills by introducing real-world employment projects that we call Digitability Work Simulations. 

Work Simulations begin by choosing a project. For example, the class may start a coffee business, learn how to market youtube videos, perform data entry, and more.

Screen Shot 2020-05-26 at 10.43.57 AM

After choosing their work simulation project, students are then hired for jobs and begin practicing workplace behavior, managing their tasks, using tech skills for independence, self-advocating, self-regulating and more.

Digitability Work Simulations include the Digitability Social Economy. In the Digitability Social Economy, students earn virtual Digitability dollars when they exhibit behaviors that will make them successful in the workplace and increase their independence. Using those dollars earned, Digitability teaches students the fundamentals of budgeting concepts, such as earning, spending, and saving.

Administrators and Program Directors can learn more about the Digitability program by requesting a free demo of the technology on this form.

Digital Literacy & Safety (700+)

  • Appropriate Sharing Behavior
  • Communicating Online
  • Applied Tech Skills
  • Advanced Tech Skills

Social and Emotional (300+)

  • Self-Regulation
  • Workplace Communication/Applied Tech Skills
  • Self-Advocacy
  • Flexible Thinking
  • Time-on-Task Attendance

Workplace Connections (600+)

  • Problem Solving
  • Resume & Online Profile
  • Interviewing Skills
  • Digital Portfolio
  • Real-World Employment Projects

Functional Academics (100+)

  • Financial Literacy
  • Reading, Writing, Math
  • Interviewing Skills
  • Executive Functions

Free Demo for Administrators

Improve transition outcomes for all students with Digitability.


Download My Free IEP Goal Bank Examples Product Packet How It Works Video Library Read More

Establishing Boundaries

“What is expected in the workplace?”

Establishing boundaries for workplace behavior and in your classroom.

Would students rather be watching videos on YouTube, playing games, or involving themselves in other preferred activities? Of course they would! However, as we know, being employed means exhibiting expected behavior, including completing assigned task in your specific job role and often by an assigned deadline.

As students are preparing for their transition to independence, Digitability  transforms your classroom into a work environment. This includes establishing boundaries for workplace behavior and using reinforcement.

Establishing workplace and classroom expectations for your students with evidence-based practices:

 

  • Using reinforcement to increased attendance to a task.  If students are not on-task in the workplace, then they are not performing their assigned job role. To develop this behavior, you can use positive reinforcement and positive narration to reward students for exhibiting behavior that will promote success in the classroom or workplace. Digitability’s Classroom Social Economy delivers evidence-based methodologies for systematically increasing a student’s ability to attend to a task.

 

  • Practice successful and problematic behavior: It is important that students fully understand the behavior expected of them, and also know how to manage unexpected behavior if it happens. Using Principles of Applied Behavior Analysis such as Task Analysis, you can explicitly teacher both successful workplace behaviors and problematic workplace behaviors. Digitability’s Classroom Social Economy delivers a complete workplace behavior system to help classrooms routinely practice adhering to appropriate classroom and workplace behavior.

 

  • Establish clear consequences for exhibiting successful and problematic behavior: Use a 5:1 radio. Delivering  consequences for behavior modification should follow a 5:1 ratio rule. For every one negative consequence there should be five positive reinforcers. While this can feel counterintuitive, it’s one of the most effective evidence-based practices to use in the classroom. Nonetheless, all behaviors and consequences need to be clearly define. Digitability’s Classroom Social Economy has a complete workplace behavior model that helps students self-regulate problematic behavior, but also helps build a sense of empowerment so they know how to advocate for their behavioral needs.

 

All of Digitability’s work-ready program materials are differentiated three ways to accomodate the needs of a wide-range of learning and behavioral needs. You can download a sample activity below.


Digitability’s Classroom Social Economy Sample Activity

In the video below, Dawn, an autistic support classroom teacher, uses Digitability’s Classroom Social Economy to increase engagement and motivation and to teach workplace behavior. Here what she has to say about how Digitability has helped her.

Digitability’s award-winning curriculum and professional development program provides extensive resources to help teachers establish boundaries for workplace behavior and teaches healthy reinforcement strategies.  We have an extensive library of differentiated (and pre-written) lesson plans for work-simulations, where EVERY student can play a role.

 

Like what you see? Gain access to the complete Digitability Curriculum and Professional Development Program by completing the form on the right.

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Immediate Feedback

“Everyone loves feedback!”

Delivering immediate feedback to increase engagement and motivation.

Immediate Feedback is a method to encourage and motivate for your students in a classroom setting. You will need to deliver immediate feedback constantly.  As students are preparing for their transition to independence, it is essential that your classroom is transformed into a work environment. You use immediate feedback once you have established expectations and boundaries for the classroom workplace.

How to engage your students using immediately feedback:

Using a consistent verbal formula to communicate and reinforce expectations, will help students develop self-regulation strategies. Below are some examples:

 “[Student name] + [behavior] + [consequence] + [reward/replacement behavior].”

Yes, Marcus! A URL is a website address. Nice job earning a participation dollar.”

OR

 “[Student name] + [behavior] + [consequence] + [reward/replacement behavior].”

Marcus, that’s an interruptions. Interruptions cost $1. Next time, wait to be called on to give your answer and earn a dollar.”

In this video, the uses immediate feedback along with positive reinforcement. The teacher uses a verbal formula and includes the consequence of earning a participation dollar immediately after a desired behavior is displayed.

 

Digitability lesson plans develop the teacher’s ability to use verbal formulas consistently and with fidelity to prepare students for today’s workplace expectations.

You can download a free sample lesson plan that uses immediate feedback here.

Here are additional links to help you implement immediate feedback with fidelity.

Download the Evidence-based Practices Webinar Presentation

Download Digitability Program & Curriculum Overview

Like what you see? Gain access to the complete Digitability Curriculum and Professional Development Program by completing the form on the right.


Download Resources

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Positive Narration

Hey you! Don’t stop doing that!

Using Positive Narration for Behavior

Positive Narration is the act of drawing attention to desired behavior instead of misbehavior. Positive narration reinforces behavior in a constructive, narrative way.

The teacher in this video uses Positive Narration, which encourages the rest of the class to follow by the student’s example. This also serves to encourage the student being showcased to continue to practice the behavior.

Digitability lesson plans develop the teacher’s ability to use verbal formulas consistently and with fidelity to prepare students for today’s workplace expectations.

Here are additional links to help you implement positive narration with fidelity.

Download the Evidence-based Practices Webinar Presentation

Download Digitability Program & Curriculum Overview

Digitability Evidence-based Practices Stage 1 Guide Sample

Like what you see? Gain access to the complete Digitability Curriculum and Professional Development Program by completing the form on the right.


Download Resources

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Peer Encouragement

“Way to go, Robert!” 

Peer Encouragement to Improve learning

To create a healthy, positive learning environment, teachers can foster behavior to increase peer encouragement. Here, when one student completes the group activity, the entire class is cheering him on. This teacher’s classroom is an environment that thrives on both individual and group merits.

It is not unusual to enjoy the action and thought of your friends and acquaintances, supporting you in multiple setting. Peer encouragement may include all eyes on the person participating, stating whether you agree or not, and making it known that you are only focused on the person speaking.

Here are additional links to help you implement peer encouragement with fidelity.

Download the Evidence-based Practices Webinar Presentation

Download Digitability Program & Curriculum Overview

Digitability Evidence-based Practices Stage 1 Guide Sample

Like what you see? Gain access to the complete Digitability Curriculum and Professional Development Program by completing the form on the right.


Download Resources

Read More

Knowledge of Student

“Smarty pants!”

Making connections using background knowledge of students.

Demonstrating knowledge of students is imperative for connecting content to the intricate profiles of students: Teachers don’t teach content in the abstract; they teach it to students. Teachers must know not only their content but also their students.

Ms. Dawn, the teacher in this video, is capable of connecting concepts for her students from how she has gotten to know them overtime. Knowing them in terms of their preferences, personalities, and how they contribute. For example, when a student perseverates on thinking about a topic or task, the teacher jokes with him for reasons of comfort, to make progress and identify the answer correct in the program

By using familiarity of a student frequently, the teacher develops an intuitive method for helping students reach their goals.

Here are additional links to help you implement using evidenced-based practices.

Download the Evidence-based Practices Webinar Presentation

Download Digitability Program & Curriculum Overview

Digitability Evidence-based Practices Stage 1 Guide Sample

Like what you see? Gain access to the complete Digitability Curriculum and Professional Development Program by completing the form on the right.


Download Resources

Read More

Accessing Prior Knowledge

“I know that you know…”

Accessing prior knowledge to make new connections

What does, accessing prior knowledge mean?

Accessing prior knowledge is when a teacher connects personal experience or background knowledge to the new content, leading to an increase in comprehension. This connects some of the new concepts being discussed to learned knowledge from outside of the classroom.

 In this video, the teacher probes students about concepts she knows they have mastered, while using differentiation to adapt instruction to meet the needs of all of her students.

Here are additional evidence-based practices and professional development opportunities to differentiate your instruction:

Like what you see? Gain access to the complete Digitability Curriculum and Professional Development Program by completing the form on the right.


Download Resources

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Probing Questions

“Why do you think it’s important to know how to use email in a work setting?”

Using Probing Questions During Informal Assessment

Probing Questions are often open questions created to elicit anecdotal experiences from participants or assess their comprehension of newly delivered content. Probing questions could be questions for clarification, debatable questions, and the list continues.

 Probing questions is a similar occurrence to using access to prior knowledge. used to access or assess prior knowledge. Using probing questions is an efficient way to have closure in a classroom setting.



Here are additional evidence-based practices and professional development opportunities to development informal assessment techniques:


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Increasing Attendance to a Task

“It looks like you are listening!”

Helping students increase their attendance to a task

Increasing attendance is the effort to make the rate rise with participation and engagement within a classroom setting. The increase in attendance can be managed by using different techniques of teaching that seem to work the best in your students work environment.

Increasing attendance is essential in special education classrooms. Sustaining attention is one of our executive functions. The teacher in this video helps her students focus on completing tasks and becoming physically and and mentally engaged with the video.

Evidence-based Strategies:

How to set expectations for your classroom with evidence based practices:

  • The teacher asks her students to give a thumbs-up signal whenever they hear the key vocabulary word, demonstrating that they are actively listening.
  • To ensure focus and create a sense of urgency, the teacher introduces a time-bound activity. This is a goal or task that is measured or restricted by time; students will have a certain amount of time to complete the task.

Here are additional evidence-based practices and professional development opportunities to help student increase attendance to a task:


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Increasing Assistance

“Is the Word You’re Thinking About Called Prom…”

How to use prompting to increase the probability that a desired behavior will occur.

In this example, the teacher’s practice of increasing assistance comes from a wider understanding of prompting, which she uses throughout the lesson in order to guide students to a correct answer.

Prompting: is an effective practice to increase success and generalizability of target skills or behaviors for learners with ASD.

Over the course of the lesson, the teacher uses all five of these types of prompting: verbal, gestural, visual, positional, and physical.”

  • VERBAL: Verbal prompts are words instructions or questions that direct a learner to engage in a target response. Verbal prompts should be simple and explicit. Verbal prompts will range from saying the entire word or phrase that you are trying to elicit from the learner, to providing only the first sound or syllable to cue the learner. We encourage you to use the vocabulary and language being taught in the learning modules to keep things consistent.
  • GESTURAL: Gestural prompts includes pointing to, looking at, motioning or nodding to indicate a correct response. These are easy to become dependent on when teaching a learner how to interact with a computer. We encourage you to use the vocabulary and language being taught in the learning modules to keep things consistent.
  • MODELING: You can act out of the target behavior or have the learner’s peer act it out to encourage the learner to imitate. Modeling can be done in full or the behavior can be partially modeled. Modeling may also include verbal prompts.
  • POSITIONAL: Positional prompting involves arranging given materials so that the correct item is close to or in front of the learner. For example, if a task consists of picking a picture of an object from a group of three pictures, you might initially arrange the pictures so that the correct choice is directly in front of your learner, while the two incorrect choices are on the other side of the table. As your learner progresses, the other cards can be gradually moved closer until they are even with the correct choice.
  • PHYSICAL: Tactile prompting involves actually touching the child. A full physical prompt might involve moving the child through the entirety of the behavior (for example, moving his hand to select the right card from an array, and then moving it further to hand the card to you or someone else). A partial physical prompt might be just touching a hand or shoulder to get the child started on the behavior.

Here are additional links to help you implement using evidenced-based practices.

Download the Evidence-based Practices Webinar Presentation

Download Digitability Program & Curriculum Overview

Digitability Evidence-based Practices Stage 1 Guide Sample

Like what you see? Gain access to the complete Digitability Curriculum and Professional Development Program by completing the form on the right.


Download Resources

Read More

Self-Advocacy

“Speak up so I can hear you!”

How to help students communicate their needs.

Communication: In order to empower our students, we need to teach them how to advocate for themselves. For example, if a student is going to be late, they need to email you and let you know. Or if the student is not able to complete an assignment on time, they need to reach out to their boss (teacher) and request an extension. Prompting them to proactively communicate their needs, will develop workplace social skills.

Here are additional evidence-based practices and professional development opportunities to help students increase self-advocacy:


Download IEP Goal Bank

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Differentiation

“One size doesn’t fit all!”

How to use differentiation in your instruction

Differentiation is tough, but an integral part of teaching.

Differentiation is made up of the adaptations that educators use to instruct a diverse group of students with diverse learning needs in the same environment.

The teacher in this video uses differentiation to modify her instruction to meet the needs of those students who have a wide-range of learning and behavioral profiles, such as processing delays, limited verbal ability and students who are on a 12th grade reading level but struggle with socialization.

She is able to use differentiation during the informal assessment, by utilizing materials from the Digitability curriculum that have been adapted to support the needs of everyone in the class. She prompt some of her students with yes/no questions, while others receive open ended questions. She uses Digitability’s visual supplements to include and assess a student with limited verbal ability. Through differentiation EVERY student is included during instructional time.

We again see Dawn using differentiation during the group activity to include all of her students. She utilizing the already made differentiated Digitability materials for her student with limited verbal ability during the group activity. Dawn may also pair this student with a more verbal student to support group work.

Digitability understands that one size doesn’t fit all. That is why we have created an extensive library of already differentiated lesson plans and supplements that teachers can easily print and use in their classroom, reducing the amount of time they spend planning.

Download free sample materials for differentiating your instruction using the Digitability program.

Here are additional evidence-based practices and professional development opportunities to help student increase attendance to a task:


Download Program Overview

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